#WilkusRelocation

We're excited to officially announce the new Wilkus Architects office in Hopkins, MN!

15 9th Avenue North | Hopkins, MN 55343
 

In our previous post, we announced the official launch of our #WilkusRelocation project. In this week's post, we explore the meaning behind and process of bringing in natural light.

Window Opening DetailThe existing building in which we're bringing new life is dark. It lacks natural light and wouldn't be a suitable office space in its current condition. To address this issue, we're "punching" windows into the North and South facades of the building. This will allow for both a warm solar gain from the South and a soft, glowing light from the North. This reiterates the benefit of an open floorplan with light penetrating the entire space.

The benefits of this natural light isn't just technical. In Derek Phillips book Daylighting: Natural Light in Architecture 1, Phillips claims that "it is impossible to judge the need for daylight in engineering terms alone... daylight is essential in providing a pleasant visual environment, contributing to a feeling of well being."

We developed sections and details for the general contractor to understand our intentions with these "punched openings." In coordination with the structural engineer, we established appropriately sized openings throughout the space. The windows will be placed above work surfaces allowing for excellent daylighting and pleasant views to the outdoors.

 

  Window Openings Before

Window Openings for Facebook

Window Openings After

Intuition and a simple line on a drawing doesn't create a window. It takes careful planning, coordination and sensitive design to place these simple elements. Thank you to our hard working general contractor and subcontractors. We're very excited to see how these openings enlighten our new space!

--Want to continue the conversation? Use hashtag #WilkusRelocation and leave us a comment below!

Sources:

  1. Phillips, Derek, and Carl Gardner. Daylighting: Natural Light in Architecture. Amsterdam: Elsevier, Architectural, 2004. Print.

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