Viewing entries tagged
Municipal

Cologne Water Treatment Plant | Cologne, MN | Project Completion

Comment

Cologne Water Treatment Plant | Cologne, MN | Project Completion

The new City of Cologne, MN water treatment facility opened in August.

Wilkus Architects provided full-scope architectural design services from schematic development through construction administration. Thanks to Di-Mar Construction Inc. for the help on this City of Cologne project, and to Bolton & Menk for including our team on it!


The City of Cologne is having an open house for the new facility on Monday, September 10th from 5-7 pm, providing guided tours through the space. Read more here.


Comment

Cologne Water Treatment Plant  | Construction Update

Comment

Cologne Water Treatment Plant | Construction Update

The water treatment plant in Cologne, MN is making great progress! Thanks to Di-Mar Construction Inc. for the help on this City of Cologne project, and to Bolton & Menk for including our team on this project.  

Wilkus Architects provided full scope architectural design services from schematic development through construction administration.

Comment

City of Brooklyn Center | Water Treatment Facility

Comment

City of Brooklyn Center | Water Treatment Facility

 

Project Stats:

Location:  Brooklyn Center, Minnesota

Client:  City of Brooklyn Center

Project Engineer:  Bolton & Menk, Inc

Architect:  Wilkus Architects, PA

General Contractor:  Knutson Construction

Structural Engineer:  LS Engineers, Inc

Mechanical Engineers:  Wentz Associates, Inc

Electrical Engineers:  Barr Engineering Company

Civil Engineer:  Bolton & Menk, Inc

Size:  27,000 Square Feet

Capacity:  3.25 MGD (Million Gallons per Day)

Cost: $19M

Completion: January 2016

Photographer: Joe Krummel

 

Should a water treatment plant be solely functional and not inspired or influenced by its architecture? Well, we don't think so.

Our internal team at Wilkus Architects worked hard with its external consultants to develop this project for the City of Brooklyn Center.  Comprised of 27,000 SF of lobby and flexible space, water infrastructure rooms, offices, conference room, extensive garages and other supporting spaces, the project establishes a new municipal building for the city.

The architecture attempts to highlight the municipal engineering processes by creating transparency and views into the otherwise dark, hidden spaces. In harmony, the integral equipment and surrounding architecture create an interesting space for educating visitors about the municipal and water resource engineering.

The city requested that this water treatment plant be more welcoming for visitors. They would like people touring the plant and people meeting there, using the plant as a backdrop for their events.
— Duane Perry, AIA

Another architectural feature that may surprise its visitors is a vertical entry tower form fully clad in zinc. This tower creates a contrast between the solidity and strength emulated from the wide usage of masonry on the project. The tower is wrapped in a glass curtain wall system that highlights the entry and creates a beacon at night.

We have worked on several water treatment plants and they're all very similar and utilitarian. The Brooklyn Center project was unique, the city requested that this water treatment plant be more welcoming for visitors. The city informed us that they would like people touring the plant and people meeting there, using the plant as a backdrop for their events.

The exterior of the building is mostly utilitarian like you would find at other plants but the entry and lobby have more character. The main concept was to bring in as much natural light as possible. The entry is a curtain wall and there is a clerestory along the south side. Even though bringing light in was primary, we still added a sculptural element for the "roof" over the vestibule to break away from the box forms of the building. The element was pulled out away from the curtain wall to minimize blocking the light and to give it a floating appearance independent from the boxes. Inside the lobby we provided large amounts of glass to view into the Well Room and Filter Room. This helped the tall lobby space volume to not be so confined because the space opens visually into the adjacent rooms.


Comment